Reverend & the Makers – New Album – @Reverend_Makers

11 Jun

“Any person that manages to fit the lyric ‘Stone Cold Steve’ into a chorus of a song and make it work deserves a lot of praise.”

They say that the second album is the hardest to make. A band achieve soaring success of a first album, an album that took them to dizzier heights than they could have imagined and then have to outdo it in order to not be deemed a failure. Reverend and the Makers have done all of that. They just about kept the ship afloat when they hit the industry iceberg with their second album ‘A French Kiss In The Chaos’ and now they are back three years later with their third record, ‘@Reverend_Makers’.

Jon McClure, known commonly by now as the Reverend, has continued to try out some new ideas with this album. Opening track ‘Bassline’ is a great start to these new ideas that the group are floating around. It’s the type of track that could easily fit into a club’s playlist, with its bassline being coincidentally its most addictive aspect.

A McClure experiment with dubstep can be found in track four, ‘Depthcharge’. If one was to critically analyse this song, it perhaps doesn’t possess the same power as a DJ Fresh track. However, it claims many qualities that many dubstep songs do not in that it is consistent the entire way through with no moments of ‘Oh, there’s another drop I expected, duh’.

Track five, ‘Warts N All’ is the best track on album. It’s classic Rev, the type of track that could fit on ‘The State of Things’. Lyrically, the song excels. It is what the album is all about; the crazy world of the internet – with this song hovering on the theme of ‘girls posing in photos on Facebook’ according to McClure.

‘The Wrestler’ is another classic Rev song. Incorporating many wrestling terms into a modern problem, what’s not to like? Any person that manages to fit the lyric ‘Stone Cold Steve’ into a chorus of a song and make it work deserves a lot of praise.

With this album, Reverend and the Makers have trialled some new sounds. It works perfectly. It is not too distant from their original sound – the one that satisfied people who were hungry for more Sheffield music in the mid to late 2000s.

Many may have lost some faith with McClure in the past. But this man and his Makers are back this time with the follow-up that ‘The State of Things’ deserved.

By Chris PJ Martin

 

 

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